Archive for the THE ART Category

The Childhood’s End Miniseries Has Given Us Some Utterly Superb Spaceship Art

Posted in THE ART with tags on January 2, 2016 by 2eyeswatching

Post 5001

The Childhood’s End Miniseries Has Given Us Some Utterly Superb Spaceship Art

Syfy’s ambitious miniseries based on Arthur C. Clarke’s Childhood’s End served up some beautiful spaceship visuals. Including the alien mothership, which looks striking and angelic. Concept artist Ben Mauro shared with us some of his beautiful Childhood’s End spaceship designs.

First off, Mauro went through an “early design exploration” phase, which was “quick, dirty and experimental to explore a range of ideas before things get locked down and refined”:

The Childhood's End Miniseries Has Given Us Some Utterly Superb Spaceship Art

The Childhood's End Miniseries Has Given Us Some Utterly Superb Spaceship Art

The producers of the show wanted more of a “wing” shape so Mauro focused on that:

The Childhood's End Miniseries Has Given Us Some Utterly Superb Spaceship Art

And here’s an animated gif showing the final render for the mothership:

The Childhood's End Miniseries Has Given Us Some Utterly Superb Spaceship Art

And more looks at the final version as Mauro tweaked it and refined it:

The Childhood's End Miniseries Has Given Us Some Utterly Superb Spaceship Art

The Childhood's End Miniseries Has Given Us Some Utterly Superb Spaceship Art

Check out more of Mauro’s work over at his website, Art of Ben.


Charlie Jane Anders is the author of All The Birds in the Sky, coming in January from Tor Books.Follow her on Twitter, and email her.

 

Advertisements

The Coolest Images From National Geographic’s 2015 Photo Contest

Posted in THE ART with tags on December 30, 2015 by 2eyeswatching

Post 4995

The Coolest Images From National Geographic’s 2015 Photo Contest

The Coolest Images From National Geographic's 2015 Photo Contest

This year, more than 13,000 photographs were submitted to National Geographic’s annual photo contest. These 13 are the very best.

Dirt

The Coolest Images From National Geographic's 2015 Photo Contest

This stunning image of an anti-cyclonic tornado was the grand prize winner. Captured by James Smart, the photo shows a monster of a tornado infused with brown dust as it sweeps through open farmland — just narrowly missing a home near Simla, Colorado. Here’s how he described the photo to National Geographic:

The tornado was slowly getting bigger as it picked up the dust and soil from the ground on the farmland. It wasn’t moving very fast, so we kept getting closer as it tracked next to the home as you can see in the image. Driving down a Colorado dirt road, we were lucky enough to be on the west of the tornado, so it was front lit. This really helped to get great detail out of the image and the perfect light for the sky and foreground.

Smart won $10,000 for the photo, and a trip to National Geographic headquarters in Washington, D.C., to participate in the annual National Geographic Photography Seminar next month.

Orangutan in the Rain

The Coolest Images From National Geographic's 2015 Photo Contest

Honorable mention in the Nature category was awarded to Andrew Suryono for this glorious image of an orangutan in the rain.

I was taking photos of orangutans in Bali, Indonesia, when it started to rain. Just before I put my camera away, I saw this orangutan take a taro leaf and put it on top on his head to protect himself from the rain! I immediately used my DSLR and telephoto lens to preserve this spontaneous magic moment.

Acrobats of the Air

The Coolest Images From National Geographic's 2015 Photo Contest

Alessandra Meniconzi received honorable mention for this photo of Alpine Choughs. The image was taken at Appenzell, Canton d’Appenzell Rhoden-Interieur, Switzerland.

Changing Shifts

The Coolest Images From National Geographic's 2015 Photo Contest

Photographer Mohammed Yousef snapped this cool pic of cheetahs.

In Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya, the cubs of the famous cheetah Malaika learned to hunt. They moved from one hill to another, scanning the lands. Here, they seemed to change shifts as one cheetah left the hill while another took her place.

Colorful Chaos

The Coolest Images From National Geographic's 2015 Photo Contest

Bence Mate took this photo of white-fronted bee-eaters as they gathered on a branch before going to sleep in their burrows.

I was working on this theme for 18 days, as there were only five to ten minutes each day when the light conditions were appropriate. Ninety percent of my efforts to capture this image were not successful. I used flashlights to light the bee-eaters sitting on the branch, but not the others flying above. At this angle, the backlight generated rainbow coloring through the wings of the flying birds.

“Asteroid”

The Coolest Images From National Geographic's 2015 Photo Contest

Francisco Mingorance was awarded first place in the Places category for this otherwordly image.

While preparing a report on Spain’s Rio Tinto from the air, I decided to include the phosphogypsum ponds located in the marshes of red, whose radioactive discharges has destroyed part of the marsh. As an environmental photojournalist I had to report this story, but had to do it with an image that by itself attracts the viewer’s attention. On a low-flying training flight, this image caught my attention for its resemblance to the impact of an asteroid on its green waters.

Hill of Crosses

The Coolest Images From National Geographic's 2015 Photo Contest

An honorable mention award in the Places category went to Hideki Mizuta for this striking photo.

There are many hundreds of thousands of crosses on the Hill of Crosses near Šiauliai, Lithuania. It represents Lithuanian Catholicism’s peaceful resistance to oppression. Many spirits of the dead are thought to live here on this small hill. When I visited this place, a girl in a pink dress ran through as if she brought peace, hope, and love.

From Generation to Generation

The Coolest Images From National Geographic's 2015 Photo Contest

This photo, taken by Jackson Hung, was captured during Chinese New Year’s Eve of 2015 in Taiwan.

I noticed how the light was coming into the room as our family members passed incense sticks to each other, sending our prayers and paying respects to our ancestors. The photo is symbolic, as the passing of incense sticks represents the knowledge and wisdom passed down from generation to generation.

Surrealist Painting in Nature

The Coolest Images From National Geographic's 2015 Photo Contest

Tugo Cheng earned an honorable mention award in the Places category for this gorgeous image.

As the largest system of mountain ranges in Central Asia, Tian Shan—which translates to “sky-mountain” in Chinese—has one of the best collections of natural landscapes in the world and is considered a paradise for outdoor adventures. Thanks to the richness of the land’s sediments, compounded by the power of erosion caused by rivers flowing down the mountains, the north face of Tian Shan is carved into stunning plateaus and colorful canyons hundreds of meters deep, resulting in this surrealist painting in nature.

At the Playground

The Coolest Images From National Geographic's 2015 Photo Contest

First place in the People category went to Joel Nsadha.

Bwengye lives in a slum called Kamwokya in Kampala, Uganda’s capital city. He cherishes his bicycle more than anything and brings it to this playground in the slum every evening, where he watches kids playing soccer.

Overlooking Iraq From Iran

The Coolest Images From National Geographic's 2015 Photo Contest

An honorable mention in the People category went to Yanan Li for this dramatic image.

In October 2014 in Khuzestan, Iran, I came across a group of female Iranian students on the border between Iran and Iraq. Some of them climbed up the tanks left after the war between the two countries and took pictures of themselves. I pressed the shutter when I saw this girl stretch out her arms and turn to face the Iraqi border.

Nothing to Declare

The Coolest Images From National Geographic's 2015 Photo Contest

Lars Hübner received honorable mention in the Places category.

After a family member passes away in Taiwan’s countryside, their body is kept in the house or in a tent built specifically for this purpose. After a set period of time, the deceased is given a funeral procession before their burial.

The Game

The Coolest Images From National Geographic's 2015 Photo Contest

Simone Monte took this photo at a beach in Rio.

Beachgoers kick around soccer balls on Ipanema Beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the nation that is home to la joga bonita—the beautiful game.

[ National Geographic ]


Email the author at george@gizmodo.com and follow him at @dvorsky.

 

Gaze Deeply Into the Eyes of This Soul-Eating Owl

Posted in THE ART with tags on December 30, 2015 by 2eyeswatching

Post 4988

Gaze Deeply Into the Eyes of This Soul-Eating Owl 

 http://gizmodo.com/gaze-deeply-into-the-eyes-of-this-soul-eating-owl-1749233299

Gaze Deeply Into the Eyes of This Soul-Eating Owl 

Owls are a popular trope in the mythologies of many cultures, some of which believed that these nocturnal creatures were harbingers of impending death, with a mission to collect wayward souls. But don’t worry: we have it on the highest authority that this screech owl will not consume the very essence of your being.

Screech owls live throughout the United States, although they’re so fantastic at camouflage you’re unlikely to ever see them. Instead, they tuck away in the nooks and crannies of trees. However, a representative of the Department of the Interior offers the slightly-unnerving, “But remember, even if you can’t see them, they can see you.” If that’s not bad enough, they continue:

Screech owls are opportunistic predators. They eat whatever they can easily catch: mice, rats, birds, reptiles, insects, amphibians and fish. But we’re pretty sure human souls aren’t on the menu.

So don’t worry about it. Your immortal afterlife is totally safe. Really.

Top image: Screech owl. Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Ed Steenstra


Contact the author at mika.mckinnon@io9.com or follow her at @MikaMcKinnon.

In Photos: Baby Animals Win Prestigious Photo Contest

Posted in SCIENCE, THE ART with tags on November 19, 2015 by 2eyeswatching

Post 4904

In Photos: Baby Animals Win Prestigious Photo Contest

Image Gallery: Amazing Photos by Ecologists

Posted in THE ART with tags on August 4, 2015 by 2eyeswatching

Post 4755

Image Gallery: Amazing Photos by Ecologists

Struggling for survival

bmc photos, Greater Adjutant storks

In Guwahati, India, Greater Adjutant storks join their human counterparts in searching for valuable items at the local garbage heap. This photo, which was a runner-up in the competition, highlights the plight of the world’s most endangered stork species. (Credit: Dhritiman Das)


On patrol

bmc photos, Camponotus ant patrols a young leaf

A carpenter ant sucks nectar from the leaf of a Coccoloba cereifera, a small shrub endemic to Cipó National Park in southeast Brazil. The ant gets its supper and the plant gets a break from the herbivores that nibble its leaves when the ant isn’t around. The depiction of this symbiotic relationship was also a runner-up in the BMC photo contest. (Credit: Daniel Wisbech Carstensen)


Snack attack

bmc photos, juvenile baboons

This might look like a photo of two juvenile baboons having a cuddle, but note the food item stuffed in the forward-facing baboon’s mouth. The snack-less baboon seems to be assessing whether its friend has plans to share the meal. This photo won the Editor’s pick award. (Credit: Catherine Markham)


Sniffing out love

bmc photos, Lampyridae beetle smelling

The Lampyridaebeetle uses its giant antennae to sniff out a mate in central Chile. This good-looking insect won first prize in the Behavioral and Physiological Ecology category of the competition. (Credit: Bernardo Segura)


Chowing Down

bmc photos, Grazing zebra

This photo won out in the Community, Population and Macroecology category. Thezebra munching on grass in South Africa demonstrates how well certain animals respond to dynamic ecosystems. The zebra’s diet is constantly changing, depending on the availability of different grasses in its habitat.  (Credit: Julia Spaet)


A desert view

bmc photos, sonoran desert

The Landscape Ecology and Ecosystems category celebrates majesty of the land. This scene, from the Sonoran desert in North America, shows just how lush a desert can be, winning it first place in the category. (Credit: Daniel Winkler)


Diversity large and small

bmc photos, Diversity of short grain rice

The diversity of short grain rice is highlighted in this image, which gained the winning spot in the Conservation Ecology and Biodiversity Research category for the BMC contest. (Credit: Pritesh S. Roy)


Mapping territory

bmc photos, GPS tracking data from a wild Californian condor

In the Theoretical Ecology and Models category, an image that combined GPS tracking data from a wild Californian condor with an image of a soaring condor took first prize. (Credit: James K. Sheppard)


Making a comeback

bmc photos, pregnant bat

Twenty years of conservation efforts have finally paid off for the lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuena), whose numbers are once again increasing after years spent on the decline and on the endangered species list. This pregnant bat is flying to join hundreds of thousands of her compatriots to give birth in a “maternity cave” in Sonora, Mexico. This photo (and all the photos that follow) was “highly commended” by the contest organizers. (Credit: Alma Rosa Moreno Pérez)


An uncommon sight

bmc photos, waterlilies in madagascar

Also receiving highly commended marks were these water lilies, which offer an interesting contrast to baobab trees in Madagascar. The child in the photo is collecting fallen baobab fruits from the water. (Credit: Kathryn M. Everson)


Unlikely allies

bmc photos, Weaver ants and caterpillar

This photo shows a group of Weaver ants atop a caterpillar, but despite how it may look, the ants aren’t hurting the caterpillar — they’re actually protecting it. The caterpillar belongs to the familyLycaenidae and secretes a sugary substance that ants just love. In exchange for the treat, the ants’ presence keeps predatory birds at bay. (Credit: Vineeth Kumar K)


Playtime

bmc photos, playful bears

These Asiatic black bears were photographed as they played with one another in Pakistan. (Credit: Kainaat William)


Bathtime

bmc photos, Hippo and buffalo

In Kenya, two unlikely tub-mates — a hippo and a water buffalo — cool off in a deep puddle. The researcher said it was the first time in a decade’s worth of fieldwork that she had seen these two creatures (both of which have reputations for being short-tempered) come in such close proximity of one another. (Credit: Graeme Shannon)


A beautiful trap

bmc photos, Ant in carnivorous plant

The more it moved around, the more the ant in this photo became entangled in the tentacles of a carnivorous plant in Japan’s Sarobetsu mire. (Credit: Harisoa Rakotonoely)


Danger lurks

bmc photos, oriental rat snake

While a paddy field worker goes about his business in Central Java, Indonesia, this oriental rat snake (Ptyas mucosa) hangs out nearby. Oriental rat snakes feed on frogs and rodents and don’t pose a threat to humans. (Credit: Mark Auliya)


Busy bee

bmc photos, stingless bee

A stingless bee pollinates flowers in Malaysia, where colony collapse disorder has hit hard, resulting in far fewer pollinators than in years past. (Credit: Mohd Masri bin Saranum)


Like parent, like child

bmc photos, Noddy tern chick and parent

A Noddy tern chick and parent guard their nest on Heron Island in Great Barrier Reef, Australia. (Credit: Michelle Achlatis)


Fast food

bmc photos, South Africa's long-tongue fly

This South African long-tongue fly catches its meals mid-flight. The fly is the only pollinatorfor more than 20 species of longtubed flowers.(Credit: Michael Whitehead)


Frog in peril

bmc photos, The Nicaragua cross-banded tree frog

This image shows a cross-banded tree frog in Nicaragua, one of many species threatened by a fungal infection known as Chytridiomycosis, which is linked to increased human activity in amphibians’ native habitats. (Credit: Mark Spangler)


Secret garden

bmc photos, South Australia’s secret gardens

Known as the “secret gardens” of South Australia, this image shows a fragile basket star (Astroboa ernae) sharing a pylon with a colony of blue ascidians (Clavelina molluccensis), sponges, brown and red algae, as well as other species.  (Credit: Daniel Gorman)


Fish and fry

bmc photos, Mozambique tilapia with yolk sac fry

The female Mozambique tilapia incubates her eggs inside her mouth, a process known as mouth brooding. Fertilized eggs develop into what’s known as “yolk sac fry,” which become free-swimming creatures in five to eight days. When the yolk is absorbed, the fishes stop seeking refuge in mommy’s mouth. (Credit: Andre P. Seale)


Dinnertime

bmc photos, Batseii and Giant Golden Silk Orb-weaving Spider

An Ecuadorian amblypygi (a type of arachnid) feeds on a giant golden silk orb-weaving spider. (Credit: Kenneth J. Chapin)


Dangerous snack

bmc photos, greater bamboo lemur

This greater bamboo lemur (Prolemur simus) munches on something that would kill most other animals. It prefers cyanide-containing Madagascar giant bamboo (Cathariostachys madagascariensis), and scientists still aren’t sure what prevents the lemur from being sickened by this poisonous snack. (Credit: Peggy Boone)

Follow Elizabeth Palermo @techEpalermo. Follow Live Science @livescience,Facebook &Google+

 

Image Gallery: Tiny Waves Shine Bright

Posted in THE ART with tags on July 15, 2015 by 2eyeswatching

Post 4734

Image Gallery: Tiny Waves Shine Bright

Blue Glass

Credit: Deb Morris, WaveArt
“Blue Glass” by Deb Morris

Blue Peak

Credit: Deb Morris, WaveArt
“Blue Peak” by Deb Morris

Clear Wave

Credit: Deb Morris, WaveArt
“Clear” by Deb Morris. Eighty-five percent of her photos are manipulation-free, Morris said, though she does apply filters to make some photos “pop.”

Goldwing

Credit: Deb Morris, WaveArt
“Goldwing” by Deb Morris

Hidden Jewels

Credit: Deb Morris, WaveArt
Bubbles dot the water’s surface in “Hidden Jewels”

Molten Blue

Credit: Deb Morris, WaveArt
“Molten Blue” by Deb Morris

Purple Dive

Credit: Deb Morris, WaveArt
“Purple Dive” by Deb Morris

The Drop

Credit: Deb Morris, WaveArt
“The Drop” by Deb Morris.

The Wall

Credit: Deb Morris, WaveArt
All that’s missing is the tiny surfer. “The Wall” by Deb Morris.

Starry Vortex Takes Top Spot in Nightscapes Photo Contest

Posted in THE ART with tags on July 10, 2015 by 2eyeswatching

Post 4728

Starry Vortex Takes Top Spot in Nightscapes Photo Contest