Destination Pluto: NASA’s New Horizons Mission in Pictures

Post 4817

Destination Pluto: NASA’s New Horizons Mission in Pictures

New Horizons’ Zoomed-in Sunset View of Pluto

Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI
A zoomed-in view of a photo NASA’s New Horizons probe took on July 14, 2015, when it was just 11,000 miles (18,000 kilometers) from Pluto. The near-sunsetscene, which is 230 miles (380 km) across, shows rugged ice mountains up to 11,000 feet (3,500 meters) high and wide, flat plains.

Fog on Pluto

Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI
The setting sun illuminates fog or near-surface haze on Pluto in this small section of an image taken by NASA’s New Horizons probe on July 14, 2015, when it was 11,000 miles (18,000 kilometers) from the dwarf planet. The image covers a stretch of land 115 miles (185 km) wide.

Vast Ice Plains in Pluto’s Heart

Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI
This image, a composite of several photos taken by NASA’s New Horizons probe, shows a vast Pluto ice plain called Sputnik Planum. The box shows the location of other detailed glacier images.

Flowing Ice on Pluto’s Plains

Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI
This New Horizons image shows how ice (probably frozen nitrogen) is flowing from Pluto’s mountains through valleys (outlined by red arrows) onto the plainsknown as Sputnik Planum; the “flow front” there is outlined by blue arrows in this photo, which covers an area 390 miles (630-kilometer) wide.

Flowing Ice on Pluto’s Plains (2)

Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI
A backlit, oblique view of a New Horizons image showing how ice (probably frozen nitrogen) is flowing from Pluto’s mountains through valleys (outlined by red arrows) onto the plains known as Sputnik Planum; the “flow front” there is outlined by blue arrows in this photo, which covers an area 390 miles (630-kilometer) wide.

Perpective View of Pluto

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
A perspective view of Pluto, based on the latest high-resolution images downlinked from NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, gives the impression of looking down from a height of approximately 1,100 miles (1,800 km) above Pluto. Image released Sept. 10, 2015.

Mosaic of Sputnik Planum on Pluto

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This mosaic, made of high-resolution images of Pluto sent back from NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft from Sept. 5 to 7, 2015, shows the icy plain SputnikPlanum (informal name), the bright region across the center.

Range of Surface Features on Pluto

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This image from NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft shows an area 220-mile (350-kilometer) wide on Pluto with very varied surface reflectivities and geologicallandforms. Image released Sept. 10, 2015.

Broken Terrain on Pluto

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft shows a 300-mile-wide (470-kilometer) area of jumbled, broken terrain on the edge of Sputnik Planum (informal name) plain. Image released Sept. 10, 2015.

Pluto’s Moon Charon

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft sent back to earth a higher quality version of an image of Pluto’s moon Charon first obtained on July 14, 2015. Image released Sept. 10, 2015.

Twilight on Pluto

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
Twilight on Pluto is seen in this New Horizons image which has been processed two different ways. Image released Sept. 10, 2015

Sun Shining Through Pluto’s Atmosphere

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
A processed image of the sun shining through Pluto’s atmosphere (right, unedited version at left) reveals multiple layers of haze.

Informal Names for Features on Pluto

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
Image showing the informal names being used by the New Horizons team for features on Pluto. These monikers have not yet been approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU).

Informal Names for Features on Pluto’s Sputnik Planum

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
Image showing the informal names being used by the New Horizons team for features on the icy Pluto plains known as Sputnik Planum. These monikers havenot yet been approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU).

Global Map of Pluto (With Grid)

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The science team of NASA’s New Horizons mission produced an updated global map of dwarf planet Pluto. Image released July 27, 2015.

Global Mosaic of Pluto Shown in True Color

Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI
Four images from New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) combine with color data from the Ralph instrument to create this sharper globalview of Pluto. The spacecraft obtained the images at a distance of 280,000 miles (450,000 kilometers). Image released July 24, 2015.
See more on http://www.space.com/16533-pluto-new-horizons-spacecraft-pictures.html
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