The Mantle Site: Photos of Ancient City

Post 1180

 

The Mantle Site: Photos of Ancient City

Owen Jarus, LiveScience Contributor
Human pipe effigy

Human pipe effigy

Credit: Owen JarusA human pipe effigy, it appears to offer a tantalizing glimpse at the faces of the people of the site. At the Mantle site archaeologists have discovered 200,000 artifacts, LiveScience takes a look at a selection of them in this photo gallery.

Another human face

Another human face

Credit: Owen JarusThis selection also offers a tantalizing glimpse at the faces of the people of the site.

Close up of a human face

Close up of a human face

Credit: Photo courtesy Archaeological Services Inc.This selection also offers a tantalizing glimpse at the faces of the people of the site.

An effigy face

An effigy face

Credit: Owen JarusAn effigy face imprinted in pottery. This practice is associated with the Iroqouis of New York state, its presence at Mantle suggests that the inhabitants had extensive contact with them.

Attention to detail

Attention to detail

Credit: Owen JarusThis pipe effigy shows a tattooed man. Despite its small size the artist paid careful attention to detail.

Facial tattoos

Facial tattoos

Credit: Owen JarusThe tattooed man’s face.

Woodpecker pipe

Woodpecker pipe

Credit: Archaeological Services Inc. A woodpecker pipe effigy, about 5 cm across. When you smoke the pipe do you become the woodpecker? That’s one idea behind artifacts like this.

Owl artifact

Owl artifact

Credit: Owen JarusAn owl effigy that would have been part of a pipe. The people of Mantle, and indeed all First Nations, held these effigies in high regard. When a pipe broke care was taken to maintain the effigy until it could be carefully deposited.

Pottery artifact

Pottery artifact

Credit: Owen JarusA complete pot, with line decoration, discovered on site.

Mysterious artifact

Mysterious artifact

Credit: Owen JarusHeld together by an unknown substance, this tiny artifact has archaeologists puzzled as to its use and the meaning of the notching.

Antler comb

Antler comb

Credit: Owne JarusAn antler comb found at the Mantle site.

Stone axe

Stone axe

Credit: Owen JarusA stone axe, made of chloride schist. The people of Mantle would have cleared the land using axes like these.

Ceramic coronet

Ceramic coronet

Credit: Owen JarusA ceramic coronet pipe with metal insert found on site.

Mantle site

Mantle site

Credit: Photo courtesy Archaeological Services Inc. The black pigments used to decorate these sherds are a type of bone black pigment which has a high calcium content (~10-12% for both sherds).

Bustling Mantle

Bustling Mantle

Credit: Owen JarusA model of a longhouse at the Royal Ontario Museum. The Mantle site has 98 of them. Built of wood, a material that does not preserve well archaeologically, the houses at Mantle were between 80 to 100 feet long and were as wide as they were tall. At Mantle two of the longhouses are substantially larger than 100 feet and would likely have been used for public ceremonies.

Cosmopolitan Village

Cosmopolitan Village

Credit: Owen JarusThe inside of the longhouse, goods were kept and fires made. An extended family would have lived in them. When a man married a woman he moved in with her family.

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